Mud Vein by Tarryn Fisher – Review

Release Date: April 5th, 2014
Summary from Goodreads:
When reclusive novelist Senna Richards wakes up on her thirty-third birthday, everything has changed. Caged behind an electrical fence, locked in a house in the middle of the snow, Senna is left to decode the clues to find out why she was taken. If she wants her freedom, she has to take a close look at her past. But, her past has a heartbeat…and her kidnapper is nowhere to be found. With her survival hanging by a thread, Senna soon realizes this is a game. A dangerous one. Only the truth can set her free.

 

 

Review:

I’ve been trying to write this review for a month. My mind tends to wander back to this story a lot. It definitely struck a chord with me. I didn’t expect it to make me feel the way it made me feel. I went in completely blind which is something I totally recommend to anyone who wants to read this book. So instead of doing my normal review where I go in depth about the story and characters, I’m going to keep this brief.

Mud Vein is not a love story. I repeat, it is not a love story. So if you go into Mud Vein expecting one, you will be sorely disappointed. Does this mean there isn’t love woven throughout MV? No. And that’s about all I’m going to say on that front.

What was Mud Vein to me? It was a story about the human condition. It was about the beauty and the darkness each of us has within. It was about the selfish and the selfless, the broken and the mended.

I hated Senna at first. My goodness, did I despise her. But then I did something more than look at Senna, I saw her. I saw Senna in myself, in my best friends, in my worst enemies. Senna represented the darkest and most difficult parts of each person’s psyche. This is Senna’s story, it’s her journey to find the truth, her truth. There’s a palpable level of mystery and intrigue surrounding her circumstance. Why is she locked in the cabin with the one person she never expected to see again? Who is responsible?

I thought the plot and characters were fascinating. I couldn’t put Mud Vein down once I picked it up. It appealed to the darkest parts of my heart. It made me feel numb, elation, and heartbreak. I don’t think this book will appeal to everybody, in fact, I’ve noticed it hasn’t, but to me, it spoke volumes. There is nothing like an author who can capture the human condition so wholly. Mud Vein showed the darkness and the self-destruction we are each capable of, but also the utter selflessness and love that makes humans what we are. So if you’re looking for a book that will challenge you and really make you consider humanity, pick this one up.

 

Favorite quotes (non-spoiler):

“You’ve been silent your whole life. You were silent when we met, silent when you suffered. Silent when life kept hitting you. I was like that too, a little. But not like you. You are a stillness. And I tried to move you. It didn’t work. But that doesn’t mean you didn’t move me. I heard everything you didn’t say. I heard it so loudly that I couldn’t shut it off. Your silence, Senna, I hear it so loudly.” 

“There is a string that connects us that is not visible to the eye. Maybe every person has more than one soul they are connected to, and all over the world there are those invisible strings… Maybe the chances that you’ll find each and every one of your soul mates is slim. But sometimes you’re lucky enough to stumble across one. And you feel a tug. And it’s not so much a choice to love them though their flaws and through your differences, but rather you love them without even trying. You love their flaws.” 

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5 thoughts on “Mud Vein by Tarryn Fisher – Review

  1. Pingback: Book Blogger Test: I've been TAGGED! - Reading Books Like a Boss

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